Pets and Fountains

Keep Your Garden Water fountain Tidy

Keep Your Garden Water fountain Tidy Water fountains will last a long time with routine cleaning and maintenance. It is important to clean it out and get rid of any debris or foreign objects that might have gotten into or onto it. On top of that, algae can be a challenge, as sunshine hitting the water allows it to form easily. Either sea salt, hydrogen peroxide, or vinegar can be mixed into the water to avoid this problem. Bleach can also be mixed into the water, but this is not an ideal option as it can harm birds or other animals.

An extensive cleaning every three-four months is recommended for garden fountains. Before cleaning, all of the water must be removed. When you have done this, wash inside the water reservoir with a gentle detergent. If there are any small grooves, grab a toothbrush to reach each and every spot. Any soap residue left on your fountain can damage it, so be sure it is all rinsed off.

Make sure you get rid of any calcium or plankton by taking the pump apart and washing the inside carefully. Letting it soak in vinegar for a couple of hours first will make it much easier to clean. Mineral or rain water, versus tap water, is ideal in order to avoid any build-up of chemicals inside the pump.

One final recommendation for keeping your fountain in top working condition is to check the water level every day and make sure it is full.Keep Garden Water fountain Tidy 5593667598.jpg Allowing the water to reach below the pump’s intake level, can cause major damage and even make the pump burn out - an undesired outcome!

From Where Did Water Fountains Originate?

From Where Did Water Fountains Originate? Hundreds of classic Greek records were translated into Latin under the auspices of the scholarly Pope Nicholas V, who ruled the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 to 1455. In order to make Rome worthy of being the capital of the Christian world, the Pope resolved to embellish the beauty of the city. Reconstruction of the Acqua Vergine, a desolate Roman aqueduct which had carried fresh drinking water into the city from eight miles away, began in 1453 at the bidding of the Pope. A mostra, a monumental commemorative fountain built by ancient Romans to mark the point of entry of an aqueduct, was a tradition which was revived by Nicholas V. The architect Leon Battista Alberti was commissioned by the Pope to construct a wall fountain where we now find the Trevi Fountain. The water which eventually provided the Trevi Fountain as well as the acclaimed baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and Piazza Navona came from the modified aqueduct which he had renovated.

Ancient Crete & The Minoans: Water Features

Ancient Crete & The Minoans: Water FeaturesAncient Crete & Minoans: Water Features 2854829053.jpg During archaeological digs on the island of Crete, a variety of varieties of conduits have been identified. These were applied to furnish towns and cities with water as well as to minimize flooding and eliminate waste. They were for the most part created from clay or stone. Terracotta was utilized for waterways and water pipes, both rectangular and spherical. There are a couple of good examples of Minoan clay piping, those with a shortened cone form and a U-shape that haven’t been observed in any civilization ever since. Terracotta pipelines were utilized to circulate water at Knossos Palace, running up to three meters under the floor surfaces. Along with disbursing water, the terracotta water pipes of the Minoans were also made use of to amass water and accumulate it. These clay piping were used to perform: Underground Water Transportation: At first this particular system would seem to have been designed not for ease but to give water for specific people or rituals without it being seen. Quality Water Transportation: The conduits may furthermore have been made use of to take water to fountains which were separate from the city’s regular system.

"Old School" Water Fountain Designers

"Old School" Water Fountain Designers Often serving as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and highly educated scholars all in one, from the 16th to the later part of the 18th century, fountain designers were multi-faceted people, Leonardo da Vinci, a Renaissance artist, was renowned as an ingenious intellect, inventor and scientific expert. He systematically recorded his observations in his now celebrated notebooks about his research into the forces of nature and the qualities and motion of water. Ingenious water displays packed of symbolic meaning and all-natural beauty converted private villa settings when early Italian water feature designers paired creativity with hydraulic and landscaping expertise. Known for his virtuosity in archeology, architecture and garden creations, Pirro Ligorio, the humanist, offered the vision behind the wonders in Tivoli. For the many properties in the vicinity of Florence, other fountain engineers were well versed in humanistic subjects as well as classical technical texts, masterminding the phenomenal water marbles, water attributes and water antics.

The Original Garden Fountain Creative Designers Water fountain designers were multi-talented individuals from the 16th to the later part of the 18th century, often working as architects, sculptors, artisans, engineers and cultivated scholars all in one.... read more


The One Cleaning Solution to NEVER Use On Your Wall Water Fountains Water fountains will keep working a long time with scheduled cleaning and maintenance.Leaves, twigs, and bugs very often find their way into fountains, so it is essential to keep yours free from such things.... read more


The Earliest Recorded Public Fountains of the Historical Past Towns and communities relied on practical water fountains to conduct water for preparing food, washing, and cleaning up from local sources like lakes, streams, or creeks.... read more


The Beautiful First Masterpieces by Bernini The Barcaccia, a beautiful water fountain constructed at the base of the Trinita dei Monti in Piaza di Spagna, was Bernini's earliest water fountain.This spot continues to be filled with Roman locals and visitors who like to exchanging gossip or going over the day's news.... read more